Home  |  About Us  |  Calendar  |  Advocacy  |  Contact Us

Members Login:

 
 
communications

Consumer Center : Mouthguards

South Dakota requires the use of mouthguards by students who participate in football and hockey; however, the American Dental Association (ADA) recommends the use of mouthguards during all athletic activities where there is a strong potential for contact with other athletes or hard surfaces.

Mouthguards, which essentially serve as shock absorbers, can significantly reduce injuries. Without them, athletes are 60 times more likely to damage or lose teeth. But mouthguards aren’t just for protecting teeth. They can also help prevent lacerations, fractures, dislocations and may even help reduce the severity and incidence of concussions.

Mouthguards provide a resilient protective surface to distribute and dissipate forces on impact, thereby minimizing the severity of traumatic injury to the hard or soft tissue. They are an important piece of athletic gear that can protect against serious dental injury and should be used along with other athletic gear.

There are three basic types of mouthguards:

1) ready-made, or stock, mouthguard;

2) mouth-formed , or “boil and bite” mouthguard;

3) custom-made mouthguard made by a dentist.

In order for a mouthguard to function properly the mouthguard must by properly fitted. For that reason mouth-formed or custom-made mouthguards are recommended over stock mouthguards.

There are a number of companies that sell mouth-formed mouthguards and they are available in stores that sell athletic equipment and through the internet. These mouthguards come in a varying quality and price. A good fit can be obtained by following the manufacturer’s directions for properly fitting the mouthguard. Parent or guardian supervision of fitting these mouthguards is recommended.   

Mouthguards made by a dentist provide the best fit and therefore the best results.   In addition to providing the best protection, custom-fit mouthguards are less bulky and more comfortable than mouth- formed or stock mouthguards, thus increasing the likelihood of the athlete consistently wearing the mouthguard. 

See the following articles from the Journal of the American Dental Association for more information on mouthguards:

SDDA News
 

Medicaid Providers Required to Provide Interpretation Services to Those with Limited English Proficiency


The enforcement of Section 1557 of the Affordable Care prohibits entities that receive federal financial assistance from discriminating on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability and sex.  The rule applies to Medicaid providers. Compliance requirements include requiring covered entities to "provide meaningful access to individuals with limited English proficiency" as well as providing qualified interpreters and translators. The compliance date for the notices is Oct. 16. The rest of the rule went into effect July 18.

The rule requires offices to post notices of nondiscrimination as well as taglines in the top 15 non-English languages spoken in the state indicating that free language assistance services are available.
The notices must be posted in the dental office, on the website and in any significant publications and communications. For smaller items, such as postcards and tri-fold brochures, the practice may use a shorter nondiscrimination statement and taglines in the state's top two non-English languages spoken.

This link provides the translated information offices are required to post: http://www.hhs.gov/civil-rights/for-individuals/section-1557/translated-resources/index.html.

The 15 most spoken languages (other than English) in South Dakota are German; Chinese; Karen; Vietnamese; Nepali; Serbo-Croatian; Amharic; Sudanic; Tagalog; Korean; Russian; Cushite; Ukrainian; and, French.

 

Medicaid providers in South Dakota have access to live translation services Delta’s language line. 

 

Additionally, the ADA has prepared resources to aid in compliance with the rule, including an FAQ and checklist. Visit ADA.org/1557. There are also sample materials available on the OCR's website at www.hhs.gov/ocr.